Home » 1890s » The Wilson Boys – Jack’s Brothers

The Wilson Boys – Jack’s Brothers


The Five Wilson Boys

1896

I had five brothers.

Percy, who was born in 1893. He was born over in Dalston, and christened over there. His name was Twentyman, but we called him Percy; he died of TB in his twenties. Then me, I was born in 1896.

Billy was born in 1899

His full name was William Nichol Wilson. His birthday was 23rd August. He died in June 1919 when his plane, a De Havilland Bomber (DH9), crashed over Belgium. He was delivering mail to Cologne. He was a Flight Lieutenant in the RAF. He’s buried in the a civilian Cemetery, Belgium. Flight Lieutenant William Nichol Wilson. RAF 103 Squadron. Died 8th June 1919. Age 19. I went out to visit the grave the next year.

By then the family were living out at Castleside, at 25 Consett Road

Like everyone the Murray’s had to cut back with the War and they had to let go of most of the staff, my father included.

“Why don’t we have a sister?” We kept saying to father.

I think he tried his hand but it didn’t come off.

Spencer was born in 1909. Then Stuart in 1911.

Percy went into a nursery as a gardener

He was a real gardener, not a half inch one. He trained with people called Kidd. The place was established by Walter Kidd of Ashfield, Shotley Bridge, to sell produce into Newcastle. Things were booming then around Consett & Shotley Bridge.

Billy worked at the solicitors J Ainsley & Sons on Tailor Street, Consett.

Like me he left school at 14 and joined them as an office boy. He had lovely writing so they made he a clerk. He did the copywriting. Everything was written out by hand in those days; there weren’t even typewriters, let alone computers to take your words down. You used a piece of copying paper that you dampened and laid across the paper to make a copy.

After the War I was shown some graffiti on a wall at J Ainsley & Sons. Billy had written his name there behind a picture that had been up on the wall. Beautiful handwriting. J Ainsley & Sons were owned by the Murrays. Your Great Auntie Pegg, she’s an Ainsley girl and your mother was at school with one of them.

Spencer was more or less an unqualified architect working for Murrays, Hoyles and Aynsley’.

They were all intermarried the Hoyles and Anandales, Murrays and Ainsleys. Spencer become a draughtsman in Billingham, then a manager to a concreting firm in Birmingham. He was like an architect, but an unqualified one.


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