Home » Posts tagged 'ad hoc'

Tag Archives: ad hoc

Creative Problem Solving Technique Library ‘Free Association’

Serial association – to travel

Centred association – to delve

Let go, from silly to rude, unconventional and conventional

More from VanGundy (1988)

Creative Problem Solving: Selling your ideas

B822 Techniques Library ‘Factors in ‘Selling’ ideas

Context

  • Timing
  • Audience
  • Idea champion

Content

Use simple language

Use a clear statement of the need for the idea. Describe the problem your idea will solve and explain why it needs to be solved.

  • Present both pros and cons
  • Provide evidence
  • Stress key points
  • Anticipate questions
  • Be persistent

Based on: VanGundy, A.B. (1988) Techniques of Structured Problem Solving, 2nd ed., Van Norstrand Reinhold. Technique p. 285

Creative Problem Solving Technique Library ‘Fishbone’

Continuing through the B822 ‘Creativity, Innovation and Change’ Technique Library handbook.

I’ve put book marks into some 30 of out 150 problem solving techniques, approaches or games. As the opportunity arises I’ll come back and give some of these a go.

Prof. Kaoru Ishikawa

‘It can encourage development of a comprehensive and balanced picture, involving everyone, keeping eveyone on track, discouraging partial or premature solutions, and showing the relative importance and inter-relationships between different parts of a problem’.

Fig. 1 From SmartDraw. REFERENCE Adapted from: Marjao, S. (1988) The Creative Gap, London, Longman, pp. 133-7

Creative Problem Solving Technique Library ‘Highlighting’

A screening technique for generating a shortlist of good ideas for triggering discussion.

  • A clustering technique.
  • Identifying hotspots.

REFERENCE

Firestein, R.L. and Treffinger, D.J. (1983) ‘Ownership and converging: Essential ingredients of Creative Problem Solving’, Journal of Creative Behaviour, 17 (1), 32-8

Creative Problem Solving Technique Library ‘Implementation Checklists’

Implementation Checklists (VanGundy, 1988)

  • Resources
  • Motivation
  • Resistance
  • Procedures
  • Structures
  • Policies
  • Risk
  • Power
  • Clashes
  • Climate

Implementation Checklist (Isaksen et al., 1994)

  1. Relative advantage
  2. Compatibility
  3. Complexity
  4. Trialability
  5. Observability

This I can use

Implementation checklist (Isaksen et al., 1994)

1. RELATIVE ADVANTAGE

  • a. Does your plan demonstrably improve on what’s currently done?
  • b. What advantages/benefits might there be to accepting it?
  • c. Who may gain from it?
  • d. How will adopting it reward others or me?
  • e. How to emphasise its benefits to all?

2. COMPATIBILITY

  • a. Does it show consistency with current practice/thinking?
  • b. Can it be shown to meet a particular group’s needs?
  • c. What group(s) would endorse it, its goals and actions?
  • d. Can it be named/packaged more favourably?

3. COMPLEXITY

  • a. Is it easy to understand?
  • b. Can it be explained clearly to different people?
  • c. Does it take long to communicate to others?
  • d. How might it be clarified, made simple, easier to understand?
  • e. Can I demonstrate the new/object’s ease of use?

4. TRIALABILITY

  • a. How to reduce uncertainty concerning its new elements?
  • b. How can the adopted try out sections before deciding to use it all?
  • c. How to encourage adopters to try part of it?
  • d. If it needs full adoption, but they insist on partial trials, what then?
  • e. How to change it to make it more easily tried?

5. OBSERVABILITY

  • a. How easy is it for an adopter to find/obtain it? Is it visible?
  • b. Can it be made more visible? How?
  • c. How to make it easier to understand?
  • d. How to best communicate it?
  • e. Are there reasons for not making it visible now?

6. OTHER QUESTIONS

  • a. What other resources could help? How best to use them?
  • b. What important obstacle are there? How to overcome them?
  • c. How to deal with challenges/opportunities it creates?
  • d. What might initiate action? And the next steps?
  • e. How to build feedback into it to allow future improvements?

REFERENCE

Isaksen, S.G., Dorval, K.B . and Treffinger, D.J. (1994) Creative Approaches to Problem Solving, Dubuque, Iowa, Kendall/Hunt p.305-9

VanGundy, A.B. (1988) Techniques of Structured Problem Solving, 2nd. ef., Van Nostrand Reinhold, pp. 255-6

%d bloggers like this: