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Swim Coach Kindle – Effective Poolside M-learning as in ‘Mobile,’ ‘Micro’ and by the ‘Minute’.

On its own content on an e-Reader such as a Kindle is NOT e-learning or m-learning.

(Though surely any kind of self-directed, personally motivated reading is learning?)

So how, in the context of swim coaching do I make it so?

There are two audiences, the athletes and fellow coaches.

I have dual responsibilities, as a coach putting in place ways to improve the times these swimmers produce (coaching) and in workforce development improving the skills of the team teaching or coaching swimmers.

(Ruben Guzman, The Swim Drills Book)

The Kindle content can be shown to swimmers; with the right content this has already proved brilliant at SHOWING the swimmers what I want them to do, complementing any demonstrations I do poolside.

Getting their eyes and ears engaged on the task is the challenge.

The right content, such as the Swim Drills Book has in place bullet pointed learning tips and focus points for the coach so that you can speed read this, or take a tip quite easily at a glance. More micro-learning that mobile-learning.

How about fellow coaches?

A colleague who was sitting out got her head around the Kindle after a few quick pointers on how to page turn (if we even all it that anymore).

She did two things, checked some progressions into swimming Butterfly for her next group of swimmers, taking from this a useful learning tip and then checked something on timing in Breaststroke for HER OWN swimming.

Next week, having primed her by email and some grabs on Kindle operation, I will show her how to highlight passages in the Kindle and add notes. Surely, as other coaches do the same, this will build into an updated, club developed learning resource that more coaches and teachers will buy into because it is OF the club … we can identify, as you can in a Wiki, the contributions being made by people with decades of swimming experience as athletes, Masters champions and highly qualified sports coaches?

Not M-Learning yet

Now I integrate the Kindle content, this and other resources into two things:

Formal Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) qualifications, for example Levels 1, 2 & 3 Teaching Aquatics and Levels 1,2 & 3 Coaching Swimming.

Develop content in my swim coach blog, that is gradually taking the extensive offline electronic record or blog set to private, that I have now kept for five years. In here I have just about every session I have taken, possibly 1,000 sessions?

Encourage, through the formal programme of teaching and coaching that we have closer integration of what we do poolside and in the gym with both these formal and informal learning resources.

I’ve already shared ideas with an e-learning colleague in e-learning who did a Kimble e-learning piece in Articulate some weeks ago.

We are going to plan out generating our own content, including exploiting the affordances of the Kindle to create a series of ‘Flicker Book’ animations i.e. by controlling the speed at which you ‘page turn’ you generate or pause an animation that shows a specific technique. This might be as simple as how to scull, or long-legged kick for Front Crawl and Back Crawl.

Fascinating. My love for swimming and coaching swimming has been rejuvenated as every time I am poolside will now be a workshop for learning.

An Aside

Four days ago 17 poolside helpers, assistants, teachers, coaches and principal teachers – a team manager too, attended a traditional ‘Tell and Talk’ point point workshop on Safeguarding Children.’ I was unwell so unable to attend. I would like feedback from this, but something more than some Smiley Faces or boxes ticked.

Any suggestions on approaches to Feedback that work without having to hire in consultants?

Humbug, journalism, popular writing, academic writing, dumbing down, engagement, access and democratization – the maelstrom of e-learning.

Have we dumbed down in the last decade?

I was on H804 BR227 Block 2-A1 on the 19th March 2001. I was in Barbara’s Tutor Group.

The block reading was extensive; it had arrived in a large cardboard box, along with CD-roms. Books galore. I’ve numbered the 33 items from which I need to read x paper or chapters. Have we dumbed down in the last decade?

Is reading, if only on a Kindle, no so valid?

Has quantity of content provided been replaced by the quantity of content we generated between each other? If so, it makes contribution the peer group and module cohort all the more important.

We are meant to browse through these and select one. Skim reading as a ‘good study technique’ of the 1990s at the OU. Is this no longer so? I fancy an Amazon reviewing approach to all required reading. I’d then pick one five-star, one three star and one that hadn’t received a rating. It’s about as good as my old technique – alphabetical order. Skim read 33 items then choose one? Never. Read all of them, then choose surely. In business if I had to review products, or interview new candidates would I do the job properly, or just give them a cursory glance? ‘If you find something on ODl course design in the set books, or in H80X Resources, which is not currently listed in the Reading guide, just email me with the details. I’ll add it to the list. John (John Pettit).

Interestingly an article we then read from Cisco does something similar to the review suggestions above, not as basic as a start rating but ‘Sounding Off’ in which the first few words of comment and listed from sixteen or so commentators.

I then turn to printed off pages, marked up with a highlighter pen. (I can’t find myself stumbling across such paperwork with such Serendipity in ten years time should I care to reconsider the contents of MAODE 2010-2011. It will be buried in, by then, 10,000 assets in my e-portfolio. As I call it, like looking for a needle in a stack of needles. Something no string of tags can save you from … because every item has a similar set of tags. Where is ‘serendipity’ 2021? Years ago I put an ‘Enter@Random’ button in my blog., I’m yet to think of a more advanced way to tap into my mind).

In this article John Chambers CEO of CISCO says

‘The next big killer application for the Internet is going to be education.’

This is too often misquoted outside the realm of corporate training – what he has in mind here is how to keep 4,000 Cisco sales people up to speed and better able to sell, not how to educate classroom based school kids.

Is the next step the Open School?

To home educate? It would make better use of what the Internet offers. I do wonder how or why I’ve ended up nailed first to the locally primary school and then an affordable private school within walking distance. My wife and I are both freelance, who cares where we could be in the world as we do everything online.

Remind me to go to the estate agents. We’re selling up!

Meanwhile, I’m glad to see ‘e-learning’ used here; I was convinced it was a term coined recently. ‘Ultimately, Tom Kelly says, e-learning will be most effective when it no longer feels like learning – when it’s simply a natural part of how people work.’ If you do things in small chunks, she continues, they become just another part of your job. And what I like most of all, ‘E-learning will be successful when it doesn’t have its own name.’

My children wouldn’t call it e-learning

It’s just homework, whether in a text book or using a computer, which may or may not go online. Do we different where our TV feed comes from anymore? It’s just more TV. It is has taken me exactly one week, courtesy of a Kindle, to drop any idea of e-readers, e-books or e-reading … these are books, this is reading – the means of distribution is different, that’s all, it’s as if I have an electronic butler handing me one sheet of the book at a time. Bliss.

I’m still some way off why I’m reading this and writing about, just picking up echoes from the past as I go through it. Kelly had some insights on e-learning (which he defines as Web-based education):

    1. Small is beautiful
    2. Blends are powerful
    3. Measure what matters
    4. New technologies require new leaders

      Was I listening back then?

      I think we were too busy trying to reinvent the world.

      These four points are understood today as:

      • Chunking
      • Participation across platforms
      • The business of measuring outcomes.

      Simply put ‘If technology adoption occurs faster because the sales force is better-trained, we have real business impact that’s measurable.’

      And then the punch line

      “One real; problem with e-learning is that traditional training people are in charge of it. No wonder it doesn’t work! Can you imagine if the post office was in charge of email?”

      Does this apply to libraries?

      Think of a book as a parcel, a report as a letter. Do we want it delivered by the Post … or by email? Are librarians best equipped to migrate digitised content to the e-brain?

      There is then a paper, I guess the equivalent of a lecture, a piece of content purpose-written for the course.

      It is good to see Vygotsky, Piaget and Papert in here .. but what of Prensky from ‘The Power of Digital Game based Learning’.

      Prensky makes this suggestion via research done by cognitive psychologists ‘such as Bruer and Tapscott in the late nineties who speculated that the young people’s minds have been literally ‘altered by the effect of a key set of digital formative experiences‘.

      Prensky then, no better than a salesman links a truism with an unproven (and unfounded) suggestion.

      ‘Tapscott’s research indicated that young people are living, playing, communicating, working in and creating communities very differently than their parents (truism) and that the ‘hard wiring’ of young people’s brains has been effectively altered by digitally based learning experiences in the last decade.’ (unfounded, ‘effectively altered’ is what alerts me).

      Let me see what I can find, where all just a click away from Google

      So I buy this to feast on:

      I’m going to have to go through these notes.

      Courtesy of Kindle I can highlight and take notes.

      I find myself rattled by everything Prensky says and how it is presented, from the glowing recommendations, to his extensive biography, to the unqualified, uncited, unresearched ‘hear say’ that considers itself to be serious study.

      He mentions the ‘popular writer Malcolm Bradbury’ but falls into the same trap of conjuring up presumptions that have no foundation in fact. This is less than journalism. It is invention. It may be what he thinks, but no one gets a word in edge ways to say whether he is right or wrong.

      As I read I felt as if I was at best listening to an after dinner speech, at worst a stand-up comic

      Prensky preaches to the converted, a certain group of secondary and primary school teachers who I can see nodding along to every platitude that Prensky offers.

      That’s my summary; the report will follow

      Book by book, blow by blow.

      Seeing Prensky so often quoted in the OU files, in 2001 and still, surprises me.

      I feel like the little boy in the crowd pointing out that the King is wearing no clothes.

      I may eat my words, I often do

      But for now, this is my stance, which I prefer to sitting on the fence.

       

      REFERENCE

      Cisco’s Quick Study by Ann Muoio. From FC issue 39, page 286. http://www.fastcompany.com/online/39/quickstudy.html

      Prensky M (2001) Digital Game based learning, McGraw Hill.

       

      E-learning 2001-2011: A perspective

      Have we dumbed down in the last decade?

      I was on H804 BR227 Block 2-A1 on the 19th March 2001. I was in Barbara’s Tutor Group.

      The block reading was extensive; it had arrived in a large cardboard box, along with CD-roms. Books galore. I’ve numbered the 33 items from which I need to read x paper or chapters. Have we dumbed down in the last decade?

      Is reading, if only on a Kindle, no so valid?

      Has quantity of content provided been replaced by the quantity of content we generated between each other? If so, it makes contribution the peer group and module cohort all the more important.

      We are meant to browse through these and select one. Skim reading as a ‘good study technique’ of the 1990s at the OU. Is this no longer so? I fancy an Amazon reviewing approach to all required reading. I’d then pick one five star, one three star and one that hadn’t received a rating. It’s about as good as my old technique – alphabetical order. Skim read 33 items then choose one? Never. Read all of them, then choose surely. In business if I had to review products, or interview new candidates would I do the job properly, or just give them a cursory glance? ‘If you find something on ODl course design in the set books, or in H80X Resources, which is not currently listed in the Reading guide, just email me with the details. Ill add it to the list. John (John Pettit).

      Interestingly a article we then read from Cisco does something similar to the review suggestions above, not as basic as a start rating but ‘Sounding Off’ in which the first few words of comment and listed from sixteen or so commentators.

      I then turn to printed off pages, marked up with a highlighter pen. (I can’t find myself stumbling across such paperwork with such Serendipity in ten years time should I care to reconsider the contents of MAODE 2010-2011. It will be buried in, by then, 10,000 assets in my e-portfolio. As I call it, like looking for a needle in a stack of needles. Something no string of tags can save you from … because every item has a similar set of tags. Where is ‘serendipity’ 2021? Years ago I put an ‘Enter@Random’ button in my blog., I’m yet to think of a more sophisticated way to tap into my mind).

      In this article John Chambers CEO of CISCO says

      ‘The next big killer application for the Internet is going to be education.’

      This is too often misquoted outside the realm of corporate training – what he has in mind here is how to keep 4,000 Cisco sales people up to speed and better able to sell, not how to educate classroom based school kids.

      Is the next step the Open School?

      To home educate? It would make better use of what the Internet offers. I do wonder how or why I’ve ended up nailed first to the locally primary school and then an affordable private school within walking distance. My wife and I are both freelance, who cares where we could be in the world as we do everything online.

      Remind me to go to the estate agents. We’re selling up!

      Meanwhile, I’m glad to see ‘e-learning’ used here; I was convinced it was a term coined recently. ‘Ultimately, Tom Kelly says, e-learning will be most effective when it no longer feels like learning – when it’s simply a natural part of how people work.’ If you do things in small chunks, she continues, they become just another part of your job. And what I like most of all, ‘E-learning will be successful when it doesn’t have its own name.’

      My children wouldn’t call it e-learning

      It’s just homework, whether in a text book or using a computer, which may or may not go online. Do we different where our TV feed comes from anymore? It’s just more TV. It is has taken me exactly one week, courtesy of a Kindle, to drop any idea of e-readers, e-books or e-reading … these are books, this is reading – the means of distribution is different, that’s all, it’s as if I have an electronic butler handing me one sheet of the book at a time. Bliss.

      I’m still some way off why I’m reading this and writing about, just picking up echoes from the past as I go through it. Kelly had some insights on e-learning (which he defines as Web-based education):

      • Small is beautiful
      • Blends are powerful
      • Measure what matters
      • New technologies require new leaders

      Was I listening back then?

      I think we were too busy trying to reinvent the world.

      These four points are understood today as:

      Chunking Participation across platforms The business of measuring outcomes. Simply put ‘If technology adoption occurs faster because the sales force is better-trained, we have real business impact that’s measurable.’

      And then the punch line

      “One real; problem with e-learning is that traditional training people are in charge of it. No wonder it doesn’t work! Can you imagine if the post office was in charge of email?”

      Does this apply to libraries?

      Think of a book as a parcel, a report as a letter. Do we want it delivered by the Post … or by email? Are librarians best equipped to migrate digitised content to the e-brain?

      There is then a paper, I guess the equivalent of a lecture, a piece of content purpose-written for the course. It is good to see Vygotsky, Piaget and Papert in here .. but what of Prensky from ‘The Power of Digital Game based Learning’ and this suggestion by Prensky via research done by cognitive psychologists ‘such as Bruer and Tapscott in the late nineties who speculated that the young people’s minds have been literally ‘altered by the effect of a key set of digital formative experiences‘. Prensky then, no better than a salesman links a truism with an unproven (and unfounded) suggestion. ‘Tapscott’s research indicated that young people are living, playing, communicating, working in and creating communities very differently than their parents (truism) and that the ‘hard wiring’ of young people’s brains has been effectively altered by digitally based learning experiences in the last decade.’ (unfounded, ‘effectively altered’ is what alerts me).

      Let me see what I can find, where all just a click away from Google

      So I buy this to feast on:

      I’m going to have to go through these notes.

      Courtesy of Kindle I can highlight and take notes.

      I find myself rattled by everything Prensky says and how it is presented, from the glowing recommendations, to his extensive biography, to the unqualified, uncited, unresearched ‘hear say’ that considers itself to be serious study. He mentions the ‘popular writer Malcolm Bradbury’ but falls into the same trap of conjuring up presumptions that have no foundation in fact. This is less than journalism. It is invention. It may be what he thinks, but no one gets a word in edge ways to say whether he is right or wrong.

      As I read I felt as if I was at best listening to an after dinner speech, at worst a stand-up comic

      Prensky preaches to the converted, a certain group of secondary and primary school teachers who I can see nodding along to every platitude that Prensky offers.

      That’s my summary; the report will follow

      Book by book, blow by blow.

      Seeing Prensky so often quoted in the OU files, in 2001 and still, surprises me.

      I feel like the little boy in the crowd pointing out that the King is wearing no clothes.

      I may eat my words, I often do

      But for now, this is my stance, which I prefer to sitting on the fence.

      REFERENCE

      Cisco’s Quick Study by Ann Muoio. From FC issue 39, page 286. http://www.fastcompany.com/online/39/quickstudy.html

      Prensky M (2001) Digital Game based learning, McGraw Hill.

      Unwell and Kindling

      When your 14 year old daughter is in bed with flu, and running a temperature, you relent when she pops her head up from under the duvet and wants to use your laptop to watch a movie and get in touch with friends.

      I think, because I use a keyboard extension that the chances that I will pick up her germs are reduced; I forget that we both use the same mouse. She blows her nose, uses the mouse, goes to sleep for three hours. I pick up the laptop, go online, do stuff like making a sandwich …

      That’s four out of four now down with the bug, only the dog and the guinea-pigs seem fine (so far).

      It doesn’t take long before I wind down

      An odd sensation, like your battery has gone flat.

      If only it were as simply as plugging yourself into the wall or changing a battery 😦

      I am just grisly and very tired

      I had a flu jab in October so I should be avoiding the worst of it.

      Sit back from this screen … you just can’t tell how infectious these things can be !

      If it is one bonus it is the Kindle

      It can be read in bed, your head on a pillow, operated with one finger, one thumb … and as my brain is mush I can make the text huge and read three words across like a TV autocue. When I fall asleep, so does it. When I wake up it is picks up where I left off. In fact, it will read the book to me … however, will it tell when I am asleep? That would be clever.

      I’ve gone from one book to several

      Between them Amazon and Kindle have their fingers in my wallet.

      I’m 46% the way through the Rhona Sharpe book. Here’s a new concept … no pages.

      In addition I have samples of six other books, two blogs and a magazine on a 14 day free trial (I will cancel these 7 days in or earlier to be sure I don’t continue with anything I don’t want)

      And new books, and old books.

      In the 1990s I bought CDs to get back or replace LPs of my youth. Over the last five years I’ve got rid of most of these and run with iTunes.

      Books, due to lack of storage space, are in really useful Really Useful boxes in a lock up garage we rented to help with a house move … three years ago. Is there any point of a book in a box? I have over the decades taken a car load of books Haye on Wye and sold them in bulk. A shame. I miss my collection of Anais Nin and Henry Miller; I miss also my collection on movie directors and screenwriters. Was I saying that this part of my life had ended? Or I needed the space (or money). I fear, courtesy of my Kindle and lists of books I have made since I was 13 that I could easily repopulate my mind with the content of these books. Indeed there is no better place to have them, at my finger tips on a device a tasty as a piece of hot toast covered in butter and blueberry jam.

      Page Views

      I do nothing and the page views I receive doubles to 500. What does this mean? I am saying too much? That the optimum blog is one per day? Or have folks found they can drill through here for H807 and H808? Who knows, I don’t the stats provided by the OU are somewhat limited. I’d like the works. Which pages do people enter on, which are most viewed, where do they exit, what’s the average pages viewed by an individual and so on. In my experience 500 page views means three people reading 100/150 each with a few others dipping in and out.

      How Kindle has changed me in 24 hours

      My bedtime reading for anyone following this is ‘The Isles’ Norman Davies.

      I read this in the 1990s when it came out. I felt it deserved a second reading. It is heavier then the Yellow Pages and almost as big. Because of its bulk I may have it open on a pillow as I read; no wonder I fall asleep. (Works for me). Having downloaded it to the Kindle last night in 60 seconds and for less than £9 I may now read more than a couple of pages at a time. I can also annotate and highlight the Kindle version. I have an aversion to doing this to the physical thing … I am used to selling on my old books. Not something I can do with a Kindle version. Which makes me think, should these digital versions not be far, far, far cheaper? Take ‘The Isles.’ The dust cover is in perfect nick, I took it off and boxed it rather than get it torn. The damp in the lock-up garage hasn’t caused too much harm. I could get £8 for it, maybe £5.

      What else?

      More on E-learning:

      • Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age. (Rhona Sharpe)
      • Creating with WordPress (blog)
      • Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms. (2010) Will Richardson
      • E-Learning by Design (William Horton)
      • How to change the world (blog)
      • SEO Book (Blog)
      • Digitial Strategies for Powerful Corporate Communications (2009) Paul Argenti and Courtney Barnes
      • The Online Learning Idea Book (Patti Shank)
      • Using Moodle (Jason Cole and Helen Foster)

      Some bought, some simply samples. The blogs on a 14-day free trial. Neither worth £0.99 a month.

      Best on Kindle

      The big surprise, the book that is so beautifully transmogrified by Kindle, lifted by it, is ‘The Swimming Drills Book’ (2006) Ruben Guzman.

      No! This isn’t what happens if your swimmer gets it wrong. This is a drill called ‘dead swimmer’ in which they float head down, then slowly extended into a streamlined position, kick away and then swim full stroke.

      ‘The Swim Drill Book’ is a mixture of text, almost in bullet point form, and line drawings of swimmers in various stages of effort to perform a stroke or drill or exercise.

      If an author needs advice on how to write for a Kindle, or for a tablet, I’d point them at this book. This is NOT how it was conceived, but it is how it works on this alternative platform.

      You can try it for free

      Download Kindle for PC or Kindle for Mac then find ‘The Swimming Drills Book.’ You can then view a sample which takes you beyond the acknowledgements, contents and introduction into the first chapter.

      A thing of beauty

      By tweaking the layout, text size and orientation, you can place the diagram/drawing full screen. It simply works, just as the stunning black and white engravings and photographs that your Kindle will feature (at random) when ‘sleeping.’

      Here’s an thought: if you’re not reading a book it is gathering dust, a dead thing, whereas with a Kindle your books are simply asleep.

      This convinces me that increasingly the prodution process, like basic web creation before, will increasingly be in-house

      This clip serves two purposes.

      1) It convinces me that companies want e-learning production skills in house. Only the exceptional project, because of its scale and desired impact, will go to specialists with superior craft and technical skills. Everything else will be in house.

      Of the 135 training videos that I’ve produced or directed I believe that all the magazine programme from employees/stakeholders, probably those for shareholders too, as well as most ‘how to’ training can be done in house.

      This leaves the ‘wow’ factor impactful, persuasive, big budget, commercial and conference opener to the external supplier or the corporate or government department with deep pockets.

      2) This clip also convinces me the the OU needs to update H807 ‘Innovations in E-learning.’ If the material being viewed doesn’t demonstrate what is currently possibly it can hardly claim to be illustrating anything innovative.

      Adobe e-learning suite used by Toshiba Learning & Development

      Take away meals and ingredients from RBS Learning & Development

      Andrew Spencer from Royal Bank of Scotland gave a talk on the development of an MBA programme for senior RBS staff with Harvard Business Publishing

      The relationhship was established with HBP prior to the economic crisis or the banking collapse. The challenge was to produce a global programme that would meet the needs of a diverse audience.

      The RBS group of companies spreads far.

      I loved the way he put it. RBS came up with two kinds of L&D offering:

      ‘Ready Meals and ingredients.’

      Perhaps there’s a place for cooking related anaologies. Mark Wagner has a podcast to an American Conference in which he calls a wiki a ‘pot lunch.’ In this respect a blog entry might be a Pot Noodle and a Twitter the last Hula-Hoop in the bag (a broken one).

      In less corporate company Andrew might have said that the ‘shit hit the fan’ in this case it was the ship.

      Some things would have to change.

      They way RBS put it is that ‘burning desire would have to transform into a desire for results.’

      The cynic may say this is like saying greed had to be replaced by need?

      Why HBP? For the brand and content and a previous working relationship.

      A series of microsites were built so that people could find their way into the information. Andrew described this as a person finding the right door to go through. I’d go back to food and talk of a smorgasbord.

      Once through this door a variety dishes are offered: insight videos, articles and indepth reports.

      Take up of the offering picked up.

      The Coaching Philosophy of Bill Furniss: coach to Olympian Rebecca Adlington

      Fig. 1. Coach Bill Furniss taking a group of prospective ASA Level 3 coaches

      The following notes were taken at a talk given by Swimming Coach Bill Furniss, Nova Centurion Head Coach and Coach to Olympians such as Rebecca Adlington.

      This talk was part of the UKCC/ASA Senior Club Coach course.

      WHAT IS COACHING ?

      Produced a great long list between us which Bill simplified to being performance driven. i.e. if you’re not improving competitive performance you are not coaching, you are teaching (or supervising).

      ‘Coaching is a process which involves a rational approach to the improvement of competitive performance through a planned and coordinated programme of preparing and competition.’  Bill Furniss

      ‘This process embraces both direct intervention strategies and the manipulation of contextual variable affecting player preparation and performance.’  Bill Furniss

      e.g. A swimmer doing 20 x 100 reps on 65 dong them on 67 told to increase stroke count, reduce weight work and/or go faster over the last 15m

      Only two people count; the coach and the athlete.

      Some Essential skills:

      • Plan
      • Organise
      • Direct
      • Observe
      • Evaluate
      • Instruct
      • Communicate
      • Demonstrate
      • Share Knowledge
      • Strategies
      • Counselling
      • Motivator

      Some Personality traits:

      • Having total belief
      • Being intuitive

      (It makes me realise why directing TV & coaching swimming have so much in common – the targets of the coach working with athletes to produce a result like the targets the director has working with actors to produce a result).

      ‘Coaching is NOT a haphazard, trial and error affair, but involves a series of orderly, inter-related steps.’  Bill Furniss

      ‘The coaching process designates the steps the coach takes in determining, planning and implementing coaching action.’  Bill Furniss

      The steps involved in the coaching process:

      • Data Collection
      • Diagnosis
      • Prescribed plan of action
      • Implementation
      • Evaluation
      • Adaptation
      • Overload
      • Progression
      • Specificity
      • Both short & long term

      Where have all the boys gone?

      They find it too structured and  methodical

      It does n’t allow boys to be boys.

      ‘Swimming is becoming a girls’ sport.’  Bill Furniss

      CF the US College System.

      Coaching Philosophy

      ‘Your philosophy and style doesn’t matter … as long as it works and it works for you … and is appropriate for the context in which it will be applied.’  Bill Furniss

      ‘It is superhuman what we ask them to do – everything hurts, even their hair hurts.’ Bill Furniss

      Ref: Coach: A Season with Lombardi. Tom Dowling. 1970.

      The appropriateness of your philosophy to the context within which it will be applied.

      Swimmers are starting to move around and leave coaches because they want a particular style.

      ‘This coaching lark is a bit more complex than you thought.’ Bill Furniss

      Once was web-based training, then became cyberlearning – currently it’s e-learning (not eLearning, certainly not e.learning and can’t be elearning) Should be just learning?

      Web-Based Training (WBT) (2000)

      Margaret Driscoll

      I bought this book in 2001. Nearly a decade on I am delighted how apt it remains, even if the term may now have been superseded by e-learning – while cyberlearning had currency for a few years too and before this we had ‘interactive learning’.

      Even a decade on I recommend the book.

      Training and learning are in different camps, one supposing a component of applied engagement (health and safety, fixing photocopiers, burying uranium trioxide, driving a delivery van, making cars, selling phones, employee induction) while the other is essentially cognitive (though with its physicality in this kind of prestidigitization).

      Yet we made ‘training programmes’ on things like cognitive behavioural therapy. Corporate and government clients had the money to do these things.

      Driscoll’s definition of WBT is somewhat longer than Weller’s definition (2007) of e-learning (electronically enhanced learning with a large component of engagement on the Internet). A bit ‘wishy-washy’ my exacting Geography A’ Level teacher would have said.

      Hardly a clear definition if it has a let out clause. But when was anything clear about what e-learning is or is not, or should be? The term remains a pig in a poke; its most redeeming factor being that it is a word, not a sentence, and fits that cluster of words that includes e-mail.

      Web-based training Driscoll (2000) says should be:

      • Interactive
      • Non-linear
      • Easy to use graphic interface
      • Structured lessons
      • Effective use of multimedia
      • Attention to educational details
      • Attention to technical details
      • Learner control

      I like that. I can apply it in 2011. I did.

      I was reading ‘Web-Based Training’ (and using the accompanying CD-rom) in 2001 and then active in the development of learning, or knowledge distribution and communication websites for the NHS, FT Knowledge … and best of all, Ragdoll, the home of Pob, Rosie and Jim, Teletubbies and the addictive pleasures of ‘The Night Garden.’

      We may call ourselves students, mature students even, or simply post-graduates, but would we call ourselves ‘Adult Learners.’

      It’s never a way I would have defined my clients, or rather their audiences/colleagues, when developing learning materials for them in the 1980s and 1990s. Too often they were defined as ‘stakeholders,’ just as well I saw them as people and wrote scripts per-the-script, as if for only one person.

      That worked, producing for an umbrella term does not.

      Adult Learning doesn’t conjure up innovative e-learning, perhaps because of the connotations Adult Learning has in relation to the catalogue of F.E. courses then comes through the door every July or August.

      This definition of an ‘adult learner’ would apply to everyone doing an OU course surely?

      The special characteristics of adult learners Driscoll (2000:14)

      • Have real-life experience
      • Prefer problem-centred learning
      • Are continuous learners
      • Have varied learning styles
      • Have responsibilities beyond the training situation
      • Expect learning to be meaningful
      • Prefer to manage their own learning

      With some of these definitions baring more weight than others, don’t you think?

      REFERENCE

      And additional references used by Driscoll but not cited above:

      References (Adult Learning)

      • Knowles (1994) Andragogy in action. Applying modern principles of adult learning.
      • Brookfield (1991) Understanding and facilitating adult learning
      • Cross (1992) Adults as learns: increasing participation and facilitating learning.
      • Freire (1970) A cultural action for freedom
      • Merriam and Caffarella (1991) Learning in adulthood
      • Kidd (1973) How adults learn

       

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